After going through the tedious process of weeding out potential candidates for a job vacancy and interviewing about half of the people who have applied, you’ve finally found the right applicant who ideally fills an important role into your organization or your company. The question now is, “What happens next?”

Ideally, when a person is deemed perfect for a job, a company hands out a Job Offer to close the deal. A Job Offer is different from an Employee Contract. An Employee Contract provides a more in-depth concept about a job, while a Job Offer plainly states the basic terms of employment.

Also see: Sample Letters

Sample Job Offer Acceptance Letter

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Job Offer Thank You Letter

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Reply to Job Offer Letter Example

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Job Offers vs. Employment Contracts

Offer Letters are generally very brief and are used informally to offer a position to a candidate. Job Offer Letters are usually the written product of what an employer and an employee have discussed in terms of wages, job responsibilities, benefits, and the date the employment begins.

An Employment Contract carries the same set of information; however, an Employee Contract provides a more in-depth statement of an employee’s job responsibilities and obligations along with certain terms and conditions such as Confidentiality and Non-compete clauses. Simply put, Employment Contracts is a more formal piece of document compared with Job Offers.

Job Offers and What’s in Them

Basic Job Details

Job Offer Letters generally indicate the basic and the most standard information pertaining to a work position. Information such as the title of the position, the work responsibilities, the start date of the employee, and the compensation are stated in an Offer Letter.

An Offer Letter also outlines the specific duties of an employee listed under the job description so that the employee will know what is expected of him. The annual base salary and the payment schedule are typically stated in a Job Offer as well.

Benefit Packages

A Job Offer also includes details about an employee’s basic benefit package. Benefits such as disability, medical, dental, profit-sharing, vacation leaves, and sick leaves should be explicitly stated in a Job Offer to give employees a heads-up of any paycheck deductions and help them consider costs.

Also see: Job Application Forms

Sample Job Offer Letter Example

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Request for Job Offer Letter

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Decline Job Offer Letter

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Accepting a Job Offer

Like all other contracts, a Job Offer requires a signature as a sign of formally accepting the position being offered. When accepting a Job Offer, an employee has the option to accept it on the spot, to take a few days to consider the option, or to negotiate the employment terms and conditions with the employer. You may also use a Job Offer Acceptance Letter to submit to your employer along with the contract.

Declining a Job Offer

If you feel like the job doesn’t fit you, or you have issues with the terms and conditions set by the employer and can’t find these negotiable, you can always just turn down the offer. However, it is important that you politely and professionally decline the offer in such a way that you do not offend anyone and thereby burn bridges with a company or an organization.

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