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The Social Security Administration (SSA) is a federal and independent agency that oversees the provision of Social Security benefits to its members and beneficiaries. The SSA provides benefits or financial assistance for people with disabilities, survivor’s benefits, child support, and retirement.

Whoever wishes to be provided with such financial assistance will have to file a claim with the SSA. If the person’s claim gets denied or if he feels that he is not getting the right benefit amount, then he can file an appeal with the SSA for reconsideration. Aside from Social Security Appeal Forms, there are various Sample Social Security Forms that you may browse through for other purposes.

Social Security Administration Appeal Form

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Social Security Benefits Appeal Form in PDF

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Size: 99 KB

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Sample Social Security Disability Appeal Form

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Size: 163 KB

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Social Security Tribunal Appeal Form

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Size: 544 KB

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Social Security Appeal Council Form

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When Can I Request an Appeal?

An individual whose claim has been denied or an individual who feels that his benefits amount is not correct, may file an appeal for reconsideration with the SSA. When a claim is denied, the SSA would send a letter explaining exactly why the claim was denied, and if the individual wishes, he may request an appeal for the decision to be looked into again. The individual has 60 days from the receipt of the letter with the SSA’s decision to file an appeal. You may also see our Social Security Application Forms that are used for applying for an original or replacement Social Security card, and our Social Security Disability Forms for applying for financial assistance in the case of a disability, whether long-term or short-term.

Four Levels of Appeal

According to the SSA, there are generally four levels of appeal that an individual can request. The letter with the SSA’s decision would contain information as to what level of appeal the individual should be requesting for them to be guided accordingly.

  • Reconsideration: For this kind of appeal, the review is done by an official who was not initially included in the decision-making for your claim. This level of appeal usually does not require the claimant to be present. The reviewer will have to look at old evidence and any new evidence provided to further support the claim.

Social Security Request for Appeal Form

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Size: 129 KB

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Social Security Notice of Appeal Form

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Social Security Payee Appeal Form Example

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Social Security Right to Appeal Form

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  • Hearing: If, after the reconsideration, you are still not satisfied with the decision of the SSA, you can file a request for a hearing by an administrative law judge who was not part of the decision-making for your reconsideration appeal. The hearing can take place in person or through a video conference, but the location has to be within 75 miles of your home. The administrative law judge will also have to notify you of the time and location of the hearing so that adjustments can be made, if necessary.
  • Appeals Council: If you still disagree with the decision after the hearing, you may request for the Appeals Council to review your case. There is only one of three things that can happen once an appeal reaches the Appeals Council. The Appeals Council may decide to decline your request because they deem the decision to be correct. They may also review the case themselves, or ask another administrative law judge to review the case further. Whatever the decision may be, a letter with an explanation will be sent to the claimant.
  • Federal Court: In the event that the Appeals Council declines your request for them to look at your claim, or if you do not agree with their decision, you may file a lawsuit in a federal district court, which is the furthest an appeal can go.

So these are the four general levels of an appeal. Aside from appeal forms, you may also see our Selective Service Forms for samples and information.

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